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The Levitt Indigenous Poetry Prize (LIPP)

The Levitt Indigenous Poetry Prize (“LIPP”) is a biennial poetry prize for the best poems on a personal, social or political subject concerning Indigenous Australians or Torres Strait Islanders. 

The inaugural LIPP will be awarded in October 2021

Every 2 years thereafter, there will be a public presentation of prizes and/or a book launch for the LIPP Edition

$10,000 for first prize

$10,000 for first prize

$6,000 for second prize

$6,000 for second prize

$4,000 for third prize

$4,000 for third prize

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The inaugural LIPP will be awarded in October 2021

Every 2 years thereafter, there will be a public presentation of prizes and/or a book launch for the LIPP Edition

$10,000 for first prize

$10,000 for first prize

$6,000 for second prize

$6,000 for second prize

$4,000 for third prize

$4,000 for third prize

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Entry criteria

All submissions must be respectful and sensitive to the integrity of First Nation Australians (or Torres Strait Islander) people and culture.

There is no age or ethnicity criteria for entries – though contributions by young entrants will be evaluated by taking into account the entrant’s level of maturity and educational development.

The LIPP’s aims are:

to create constructive dialogue between White and Black Australians.

To erode the ‘gap’ that exists between White and Black Australians by creating awareness of the level of inequality that persists.

To focus creatively on solutions to Indigenous disadvantage. 

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Entry criteria

All submissions must be respectful and sensitive to the integrity of First Nation Australians (or Torres Strait Islander) people and culture.

There is no age or ethnicity criteria for entries – though contributions by young entrants will be evaluated by taking into account the entrant’s level of maturity and educational development.

The LIPP’s aims are:

to create constructive dialogue between White and Indigenous Australians.

To erode the ‘gap’ that exists between White and Indigenous Australians by creating awareness of the level of inequality that persists.

To focus creatively on solutions to Indigenous disadvantage. 

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Terms & Conditions

*All entrants and contributors must warrant that they own the copyright in their own work and must ordinarily be residents of Australia.

*All entrants and contributors will need to sign a non-exclusive Copyright licence to publish and/or reproduce their works for the LIPP, which is being run as a not-for-profit enterprise.

Terms & Conditions

*All entrants and contributors must warrant that they own the copyright in their own work and must ordinarily be residents of Australia.

*All entrants and contributors will need to sign a non-exclusive Copyright licence to publish and/or reproduce their works for the LIPP, which is being run as a not-for-profit enterprise.

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The LIPP Edition

An anthology of the best 100-150 entries from the previous award period will be published in the biennial LIPP Edition, by Saray Holdings. The net sale and sponsorship proceeds will be given to the Indigenous Literacy Foundation, or another registered charity, established specifically for the advancement of Indigenous Australians. 

Artists are invited to submit works with subject matter relevant to a personal or political subject concerning Indigenous Australians &/or Torres Strait Islanders. A selection of works will be included as illustrations in the LIPP Edition and will also be exhibited at the Clare Gallery, Sydney. 

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The LIPP Edition

An anthology of the best 100-150 entries from the previous award period will be published in the biennial LIPP Edition, by Saray Holdings. The net sale and sponsorship proceeds will be given to the Indigenous Literacy Foundation, or another registered charity, established specifically for the advancement of Indigenous Australians. 

Artists are invited to submit works with subject matter relevant to a personal or political subject concerning Indigenous Australians &/or Torres Strait Islanders. A selection of works will be included as illustrations in the LIPP Edition and will also be exhibited at the Clare Gallery, Sydney. 

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The LIPP Judges

Douglas Campbell

Douglas Campbell QC is a Barrister based in QLD. His primary areas of practice include Civil & Human Rights & Discrimination law, Commercial Law, Personal Injury Law, Property Law and Trade Practices & Competition Law.

Mr Campbell has acted for a number of aboriginal communities including:

  • the Hope Vale and Wujal Wujal aboriginal communities in the mediation of the aboriginal underpayment of wages claims;
  • the Hope Vale Aboriginal Shire Council in an administrative review application seeking a new grantee of the Hope Vale Deed of Grant of Land in Trust;
  • the Kowanyama and Aurukun Shire Councils in an administrative review relating to a liquor licence; and
  • a number of parties (including the Hopevale Aboriginal Shire Council) in a Federal Court application under the Judicial Review Act to set aside the registration of an ILUA at Hopevale.

Megan Krakouer

Megan Krakouer is both a lawyer and the Director of National Suicide Prevention and Trauma Recovery Project. She has a long history of working alongside the most vulnerable and the Indigenous community. A highlight of her career is her contribution to the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse, for which Krakouer has now turned her focus to calling for a Royal Commission into Child Removals.

Joshua Creamer

Joshua Creamer is a lawyer who specialises in class actions and native title. As he is Waanyi and Kalkadoon, he has a personal affinity and interest in protecting the rights of Indigenous groups. This is demonstrated by his appearance in the landmark class actions, Wotton v State of Queensland [2016] FCA 1457 (‘The Palm Island Case’) and Pearson v State of Queensland (No 2) [2020] FCA 619 (‘Stolen Wages Qld’). The first being Australia’s a largest racial discrimination case and the latter the nation’s largest human rights case.

Bibi Barba

As an Aboriginal artist, Bibi Barba is inspired by her Grandmother’s storytelling and her love of the land. Barba’s colourful work captivates a sense of vivid storytelling by blending traditional indigenous design with contemporary and innovative colour combinations.

Speaking fondly about her childhood Bibi says, “Every Sunday night, we’d go to Nan’s for dinner, and she would tell us stories of her life. She would say, ‘you have to go back home. Go home and get the feeling for your country. Feel it. Paint it’.”

Tanya Neal

Director of Policy, Research and Engagement and is a part of the NSW Aboriginal Education Consultative Group Incorporated in the NSW Government Education.

Educational leader and enthusiast.

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